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· 3 min read
Nico Jansen

If you've used Stryker before, you'll know that it produces a gorgeous report you can view in the browser. It works by generating HTML files based on the events raised by Stryker. During development of Stryker4s and Stryker.NET, we realized that producing the same report would be a lot of work.

Instead of a new HTML reporter implementation for each Stryker framework, we've decided to move the logic of presenting the report to your browser. That way, any framework can support an HTML report simply by producing a JSON file.

We call it mutation testing elements and it is implemented using the mature web components suite of features. You can now use it in Stryker, Stryker.NET and Stryker4s

· 3 min read
Hugo van Rijswijk

This is the first official release of Stryker4s! Bringing easy mutation testing to Scala sbt projects. And it comes with some great features.

It's taken a little longer than we maybe would've liked, but we are very proud of this first release. In this blog post we'll tell you about why running with the sbt plugin is a big improvement, and some of the features you can use today for Stryker4s. Although it's still possible to use the command-runner for non-sbt projects, we decided a sbt plugin was an important for the first release.

· 3 min read
Nico Jansen

Stryker now supports bundling your code using webpack before running your tests. The installation/upgrade scenario's in this blog post can be circumvented by using the Quickstart if you don't already use Stryker in your project.